Tactical Emergency Casualty Care

PEMT is committed to providing relevant, applicable, real-world validated tactics, TECC recognized educational contenttechniques, and procedures to our clientele.  Our Tactical Emergency Casualty Care EMS and TECC LE course is based upon the latest guidelines outlined by the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care.

“The Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (C-TECC) was convened to speed the transition of military medical lessons learned from the battlefield to civilian crisis response in order to reduce preventable causes of death in both our first responders and civilian population.”

Description: This 16 hour course is tailored for Law Enforcement and EMS professionals who may be called upon to respond to mass casualty situations, active shooter scenarios, or other unstable dynamic environments. Sharing the 2 day event, skill stations are tailored to the participants for both EMS and LEO participants.

 

Pre-Requisites: TECC EMS is for those applicants who already hold a license or certification as a health care provider or prehospital provider (i.e. Advanced Wilderness First Aid, Emergency Medical Responder, Primary Care Paramedic, Advanced Care Paramedic, etc).  Proof of certification or licensure is required.

TECC LE is for active law enforcement members, currently employed by a British Columbia or Federal law enforcement agency.  Members of the Canadian Armed Forces, Regular or Reserve are also eligible to attend. Proof of employment is required.

Course Length: 16 hours of instruction over two days.

Course Materials: Course materials will be distributed during the course. There is no required pre reading for the TECC EMS or TECC LE.

Course Content:

TK, ND, IO

Didactic:

  • Situational Awareness;
  • Massive hemorrhage control using tourniquets, wound packing, various dressings and bandages, hemostatic agents, tactical traction devices, pelvic binding;
  • Airway management in a tactical environment and respiratory support;
  • Support of circulation, including robust field IV configuration, fluid resuscitation decision making, procoagulants, tourniquet removal;
  • Guidelines for head injury treatment and hypothermia management;
  • Pharmacology decisions for responders, which common medications may impede survival in tactical situations.
  • START Triage
Practice makes perfect, especially for rarely-performed psychomotor skills like IO infusions!

Practice makes perfect!

Skill Stations:

  • Massive hemorrhage control using tourniquets, wound packing, various dressings and bandages, hemostatic agents, tactical traction devices, pelvic binding;
  • Modified Rapid Trauma Survey adapted for low-light, sensory overload, sensory deprivation environments;
  • Airway management in a tactical environment and respiratory support;
  • Casualty movement and packaging, from tactical drags and carries and a wide selection of casualty evacuation devices;
  • Extremity Trauma (including pelvic immobilization and femur traction splinting)

Course Completion Requirements: Students must participate in all elements of the course and demonstrate suitable skills consistent with their licensure and scope of practice.

Length of Certification: TECC is an awareness course which does not lead to certification or licensure.  As with all perishable skills, regular practice and review is highly recommended.

EMALB CME Credits: The BC EMALB has pre-approved this course for 16 CME Credits.  Please see the list HERE.

Canadian forces medics treat Afghan casualties in Kandahar, Afghanistan

Canadian forces medics treat Afghan casualties in Kandahar, Afghanistan

About the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care The Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) guidelines are a set of best practice recommendations for casualty management during civilian tactical and rescue operations. Based upon the principles of Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), TECC accounts for the differences in the civilian environment, resources, patient population, and scope of practice from the military combat environment of TCCC. C-TECC remains an independent civilian entity but maintains a close relationship with cotccc for guidance and support. Taking into account that wounding patterns and mechanisms of injury may be similar in civilian incidents involving ballistic and explosive wounding, TECC recommends treatment modalities based on the situation and available assets. The primary TCCC tenants of placing far forward timely medical care, and doing the right thing at the right time, are also paramount in the TECC guidelines. As with TCCC, TECC is divided into three phases of care based on the relationship of the provider, the casualty, and the threat.

http://c-tecc.org/about

Due to license level differences in British Columbia not all skills are suitable....

There are differences between TECC skills and responder levels in British Columbia. PEMT advises all EMA to work within the limits of your licensed scope of practice and your employers guidelines.