More (well, some!) evidence to back up hemostatic dressings.

Unlike tourniquets and TXA, both of which have  a robust and growing body of literature to support their use, hemostatic dressings such as Quickclot, Combat Gauze, WoundStat etc have had limited published field experience to support their use.
EMS1 on Hemostatics

Blowout Kit

Blowout Kit

 

In US DoD studies, Combat Gauze was chosen as the agent of choice, but that decision was largely based on animal models, which are great, but provide limited value and don’t always translate well to clinical practice. Some suggest they are about 30% more effective than good wound packing with regular materials.

But here’s a study from Israel that supports their effectiveness in the field about 90% of the time!  Keep in mind that this is a small study, but it’s pretty reflective of this authors experience with hemostatics in the military setting, includes extremity and junctional injuries, and acknowledges where there are gaps in the data.

Hemostatic agents in their current form seem to be a potent addition to the hemorrhage control arsenal, and have lots of cheerleaders in the military health care community, but are not a silver bullet that will stop every source of bleeding.  Here’s hoping one of the many gels, foams, CO2 delivered TXA interventions is THE answer to the bleeding patient!