New First Responder Guidance on IED/Active Shooter Incidents

TECC recognized educational content“…there is no single model for providing care during law enforcement operations and that TEMS basic principles should be considered core law enforcement skills relevant to all police operations, as NTOA “supports the efforts of the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (C-TECC) and others to foster the development of standardized taxonomy and evidence based clinical practice guidelines tailored to the law enforcement mission.”

The US Department of Homeland has released their latest guidance for planning for and responding to IED and Active Shooter events. This paper reinforces our core belief that civilian trauma response can be greatly improved by the rapid adoption of the lessons which we have learned in decades of military operations and research.

This report looks at the role police, fire, and EMS should play in planning for and responding to deliberate mass casualty events; it identifies critical areas of coordination, Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for hemorrhage control, damage control surgery, hemostatic agents etc.

Unified command must be established, and will always be under law enforcement command while the event remains active.  LEO will move as quickly as possible to engage and stop the shooter, contain the incident from unauthorized ingress, and prevent escape.  Casualty care will come later.  EMS and Fire must orient their resources for rapid access and anticipated tasks which focus on triage, rapid hemorrhage control, limited airway management, and rapid transport out of the warm zone.

“The protocols and procedures should also address non-traditional roles of EMS and fire personnel. These roles include the use of properly trained, armored (not armed) medical personnel who are accompanied by law enforcement into areas of mitigated risk (warm zones). In these roles, life-saving care (i.e., hemorrhage control and airway management) and evacuation of the injured from the warm zone may help improve survivability of victims.”

Police will have their hands full in dealing with policing duties, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have a role to play in casualty care.   “…the National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) states that there is a need for all police officers to have basic Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) medical training in order to potentially save the lives of victims, bystanders, police officers, and suspects in the event they are wounded.”

Over the next few weeks we’ll take a look at more elements of the DHS guidelines, and some of the scenarios they include in it!